Newsroom: 2009 Archives

December 2009

12/22/09 - Teva Animal Health, Inc. expands nationwide ketamine recall. (Updated 1/4/2010)


FDA Launches New Pet Health and Safety Widget

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today launched its Pet Health and Safety Widget for consumers as part of an ongoing effort to provide timely, user-friendly, public health information

November 2009

Alleged veterinarian scam draws drug charges - Woman targeted 16 clinics, prosecutors claim.


11/9/2009 - FDA Health Alert for Certain Pet Treats Made by Pet CarouselProducts may be contaminated with Salmonella.

 


11/9/2009 - PetSmart Voluntarily Recalls Dentley's Beef Hooves

 


FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine Alerts Veterinarians About Problems with Vetsulin® to Treat Diabetes in Dogs and Cats

VETSULIN® PRODUCT ALERT: INFORMATION FOR VETERINARIANS


Companies recall pet foods after issues with thiamine, mold, plastic

Several companies have recently recalled certain cat foods deficient in thiamine, dog foods containing mold, and dog foods that could contain plastic.

Diamond Pet Foods recalled several lots of cat foods deficient in thiamine that Diamond manufactured for Premium Edge Pet Foods. The recall applies to Premium Edge Finicky Adult Cat food and Premium Edge Adult Cat Hairball Management food with date codes of RAF0501A22X 18 lb., RAF0501A2X 6 lb., RAF0802B12X 18 lb. (BB30FEB11), RAH0501A22X 18 lb., RAH0501A2X 6 lb. The dates of manufacture are May 28 and Aug. 30.

Wysong recalled certain lots of dry dog foods containing mold—but no mycotoxins—that the company manufactured in June and July. The recall affects lots 090617, 090624, 090706, and 090720 of Wysong Maintenance dog food and lot 090623 of Wysong Senior dog food.

Nutro Products recalled several lots of dog foods with a best-by date of Sept. 10 after finding pieces of a worker’s plastic hat in the production line. The company determined that the final products probably did not contain any plastic.

The recall applies to Nutro Ultra Puppy food in 4.5-pound packages, bar code 79105 51313, and Nutro Natural Choice: Chicken Meal, Rice and Oatmeal Formula Small Bites Puppy food in 5-pound packages, bar code 79105 23050, from PetSmart stores in Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas. The recall also affects Nutro Ultra Puppy food in 30-pound packages, bar code 79105 51315, from Petco stores in California, Hawaii, Nevada, and Utah.

AVMA News Bulletin Tuesday, October 27, 2009


October 2009

Several Seattle-area veterinary clinics hit by woman seeking Tramadol

Several Seattle veterinary clinics report that an individual posing as a client has successfully obtained Tramadol from several Seattle Eastside clinics. According to various reports, a female client has presented a dog for lameness and requested a refill for Tramadol. Once given the medication, she makes an excuse that she has to get her wallet from her car to pay for it and then does not return. 

The client has reportedly given false names and brings in a dog that has been named both Toomie and Zumi. The dog, in fact, has right rear lameness. She claims to be from out-of-town, listing false Colorado and Florida addresses and false phone numbers. She has been accompanied by a young girl who supposedly is her daughter.
 
The woman’s story varies from one clinic to the next. She has told at least one clinic that the dog was recently diagnosed with a partial cruciate tear.  Another clinic reports that the woman has claimed to be driving back to Denver and is unable to see her regular veterinarian for the next four weeks.  She has declined radiographs and has stated that she will consider surgical consultation at a later time.
 
If this woman comes to your clinic, please contact Officer Derek Hill at the Kirkland Police Department with case number 09-32631 at dhill@ci.kirkland.wa.us.

FDA Alerts Pet Owners to Voluntary Recall of Premium Edge Cat Food

FDA is providing the following information from Premium Edge Pet Foods to alert pet owners of a voluntary recall of certain cat foods manufactured by Diamond Pet Foods for Premium Edge.


September 2009

September 15, 2009 - Canine Influenza not endemic in Washington State
In May 2009, the USDA approved the licensure of the first vaccine for canine influenza. The canine influenza vaccine is intended as an aid in the control of disease associated with the virus. Although the vaccine may not prevent infection altogether, efficacy trials have shown that it may significantly reduce the severity and duration of clinical illness. Furthermore, the vaccine reduces the amount of virus shed and shortens the spreading period, thus reducing spread of disease between dogs. Read full story.


AAHA Launches Universal Pet Microchip Lookup Tool

Combined with a collar and current name tag, a microchip increases the likelihood of a lost pet being safely reunited with its owner. However, even with a microchip scanner, identifying the correct pet recovery registry to contact can be challenging.

To alleviate the guesswork for veterinary hospitals, animal control facilities and shelter staff members, theAmerican Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) has created the AAHA Universal Pet Microchip Lookup Tool, a free, internet-based resource that assists with microchip identification; helping reunite pets and owners by checking participating pet recovery services’ registries to determine which registry should be contacted. The AAHA Universal Pet Microchip Lookup Tool can be accessed online at www.petmicrochiplookup.org.


World Rabies Day is September 28

World Rabies Day, now in its third year, aims to raise awareness about the public health impact of human and animal rabies. Find out more information at http://www.avma.org/animal_health/wrd/default.aspand http://www.worldrabiesday.org/.


Keep up to date on the latest H1N1 Influenza (Swine Flu) information.


Sept. 4, 2009

WSDA News: Franklin County added to areas with West Nile virus infected horses

OLYMPIA - West Nile virus (WNV) has been confirmed in seven more horses, including one in Franklin County, the first confirmed equine case in the county for 2009, the Washington State Department of Agriculture announced today. Two of the horses have been put down; the other five are recovering.

A Quarter horse gelding from Pasco was euthanized earlier this week. The attending veterinarian reports the horse was not current with vaccines for WNV. The age of the horse was not immediately available.

Additional cases confirmed Thursday by the Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in Pullman include:
* A 16-year-old Paint mare in Benton City was euthanized. The
horse was not current with vaccines.
* An 11-year-old Arabian gelding in Benton City is recovering. The
horse was not vaccinated. 
* A one-year-old Paint mare in Benton City is doing well. The
horse was not current with vaccinations.
* A 20-year-old Quarter horse gelding in Warden is gradually
improving. The horse was not vaccinated.
* A 4-year-old Tennessee Walker Appaloosa mix in Ellensburg is
recovering. The horse was not vaccinated.
* A 4- year-old Arabian mare in Ellensburg is recovering. The
horse was not current with vaccinations.

The total number of confirmed cases of WNV infection in horses stands at
39 as of Sept. 3, with cases confirmed in Adams, Benton, Grant, Kittitas, Yakima and now Franklin counties. The first cases were announced July 24. No confirmed cases of West Nile virus in horses have been reported in Western Washington this year.

WNV is spread by mosquitoes that have fed on an infected bird. The disease can sicken people, horses, many types of birds, and other animals. It is not spread from horses to other animals.

WNV is fatal in about one-third of all horses that show clinical signs, although most horses do not become ill and show no symptoms at all.
Those that do become ill display loss of coordination, loss of appetite, confusion, fever, stiffness, and muscle weakness, particularly in the hindquarters.

Veterinarians who learn of potential WNV infections in horses or other animals should contact the State Veterinarian's Office at (360) 902-1881.

Additional information on WNV can be found at the state Department of Health Web site at www.doh.wa.gov/WNV.

August 2009

8/18/2009
WSDA News: Grant County horses hit with West Nile virus; horse cases reported in five counties now

OLYMPIA - West Nile virus (WNV), a potentially fatal disease in equines, has been confirmed in two horses in Grant County, the first cases in the county for 2009, the Washington State Department of Agriculture announced today.

A 14-year-old Quarter horse gelding from Ephrata has been euthanized.
Also euthanized was a five-year-old Quarter horse mare from Grand Coulee. Neither horse had been vaccinated for WNV.

Two additional cases confirmed today by the Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in Pullman include a four-year-old Haflinger mare in Othello, which has almost recovered. The horse was not vaccinated.
A-four-year-old Arabian gelding in Yakima is recovering. The Yakima horse was not current with its vaccinations.

The total number of confirmed cases of WNV infection in horses stands at
17 as of Aug. 18, with cases reported in Adams, Benton, Kittitas, Yakima and now Grant counties. The first cases were announced July 24.

WNV is spread by mosquitoes that have fed on an infected bird. The disease can sicken people, horses, many types of birds, and other animals. It is not spread from horses to other animals.

Last year, Washington had confirmed cases of WNV in horses in Yakima, Grant, Benton and Kittitas counties. In previous years, WNV horse cases have been detected in Western Washington as well.

WNV is fatal in about one-third of all horses that show clinical signs, although most horses do not become ill and show no symptoms at all.
Those that do become ill display loss of coordination, loss of appetite, confusion, fever, stiffness, and muscle weakness, particularly in the hindquarters.

Veterinarians who learn of potential WNV infections in horses or other animals should contact the State Veterinarian's Office at (360) 902-1881.

Additional information on WNV can be found at the state Department of Health Web site atwww.doh.wa.gov/WNV and at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Web site atwww.aphis.usda.gov/vs/nahss/equine/wnv.8/17/2009.


AVMA responds to Pew Report on Industrial Farm Production

The AVMA has issued a response to the Final Report of the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production. The AVMA’s response is currently being widely distributed through several different channels. Congressional leaders in agriculture and public health, Senate and House committees, and key stakeholders have been identified and targeted for personal delivery of the AVMA response. Read the full report and view relevant multimedia materials, including podcasts and a video, at www.avma.org/PEWresponse.

The Final Report of the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production is being used to advocate for passage of federal legislation H.R 1549 and S. 619, the Preservation of Antibiotics for Medical Treatment Act(PAMTA), which the AVMA does not support. Please ask Congress to vote “NO” on PAMTA. You can take action by clicking the link below and entering your zip code. http://avmacan.avma.org/avma/issues/alert/?alertid=13873126.


8/7/2009
Two West Nile virus horse cases reported: Adams and Benton counties

OLYMPIA - West Nile virus (WNV), a potentially fatal disease in equines, has been confirmed in two horses, bringing this year's total to five confirmed cases of horses testing positive for the disease, the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) announced today.

A five-year-old Quarter horse gelding in Othello, has made a slight recovery. The Othello horse was not vaccinated for WNV and is the first horse confirmed to have contracted the disease in Adams County this year. A four-year-old Quarter horse gelding in Kennewick has been euthanized due to the illness. The horse had not been vaccinated.

Previously announced cases, beginning July 24, were confirmed in horses located in Ellensburg, Toppenish and Prosser. The Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in Pullman reported the test results to the State Veterinarian's Office.

WNV is spread by mosquitoes that have fed on an infected bird. The disease can sicken people, horses, many types of birds, and other animals. It is not spread from horses to other animals.

Last year, Washington had confirmed cases of WNV in horses in Yakima, Grant, Benton and Kittitas counties. In previous years, WNV horse cases have been detected in Western Washington as well. Virtually all of the horses that acquired West Nile virus last year were not current with vaccinations.

WNV is fatal in about one-third of all horses that show clinical signs, although most horses do not become ill and show no symptoms at all.
Those that do become ill display loss of coordination, loss of appetite, confusion, fever, stiffness, and muscle weakness, particularly in the hindquarters.

Veterinarians who learn of potential WNV cases in horses or other animals should contact the State Veterinarian's Office at (360) 902-1881.

Additional information on WNV can be found at the state Department of Health Web site atwww.doh.wa.gov/WNV and at the U.S. Department of Agriculture Web site atwww.aphis.usda.gov/vs/nahss/equine/wnv.


July 2009

First cases of West Nile virus in horses for year reported in Toppenish, Prosser

Washington State Department of Agriculture

News Release: July 24, 2009
Contact: Mike Louisell (360) 902-1813

First cases of West Nile virus in horses for year reported in Toppenish, Prosser Washington topped U.S. in 2008 with 41 horses testing positive for the virus

OLYMPIA - West Nile virus (WNV), a potentially fatal disease in equines, has been confirmed in two horses, one in Toppenish and the other in Prosser, the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) announced today.

Neither horse was vaccinated for WNV. An eight-year-old Quarter horse mare in foal in Toppenish was euthanized. The Prosser horse, a nine-year-old Quarter horse gelding, is expected to recover.

These are the first confirmed cases this year of horses contracting West Nile virus in Washington. The Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory in Pullman reported the positive test results to WSDA today. The lab is operated by Washington State University.

WNV is spread by mosquitoes that have fed on an infected bird. The disease can sicken people, horses, many types of birds and other animals. It is not spread from horses to other animals.

Washington led the nation last year in confirmed cases of WNV with 41 horses testing positive: 26 horses in Yakima County; 10 in Grant County; four in Benton County; and one horse in Kittitas County. In previous years, WNV horse cases have been detected in Western Washington as well.
Nearly all of the horses that acquired West Nile virus last year were not current with vaccinations.

WNV is fatal in about one-third of all horses that show clinical signs, although most horses do not become ill and show no symptoms at all.
Those that do become ill display loss of coordination, loss of appetite, confusion, fever, stiffness and muscle weakness, particularly in the hindquarters.

"Vaccinating your horse or getting the proper booster shots is the best way to help protect your animal and prevent greater expense from treating your horse after the disease is acquired," said State Veterinarian Dr. Leonard Eldridge. "An annual booster dose should be administered prior to the start of the mosquito season."

Horse owners should consult with their veterinarians for vaccination recommendations and WNV control measures. The vaccine requires two doses the first year of vaccination two to four weeks apart. Immunity will not be achieved until three to five weeks after the second vaccination, so it's important to avoid waiting until mosquito season is in full swing.
The first case in 2008 for a horse was confirmed in August.

The state veterinarian also recommends that horse owners take measures to reduce mosquito populations. Precautions include removing standing water from yards and barns and regularly changing water in troughs or bird baths that could be a source of mosquito breeding.

Veterinarians who learn of potential WNV cases in horses or other animals should contact the State Veterinarian's Office at (360) 902-1881.

State and local health, mosquito control districts, other state agencies and volunteers work together on environmental monitoring and prevention measures for the virus. Additional information on WNV can be found at the state Department of Health Web site at www.doh.wa.gov/WNV.


June 2009

AVMA Opening Ceremony Controversy - Pike Place Fish Market Educational Program

A message from Dr. Lyle Vogel, AVMA Assistant Executive Vice President

Some of you are already aware of the controversy surrounding the inclusion of a motivational presentation by the Pike Place Fish Market during the Opening Ceremony at the upcoming AVMA Convention.

Regarding this issue, the AVMA Executive Board has completed an open letter to members that is posted on the AVMA Website at

http://www.avma.org/issues/animal_welfare/avma_letter_pike_place.asp  

The letter explains the Executive Board's process for consideration of the controversy surrounding the inclusion of this motivational presentation during the Opening Ceremony at the upcoming AVMA Convention.

The letter also explains the reasoning that led to the conclusion to continue with the presentation as it was originally designed, using real, dead fish.

Also FYI, an AVMA Press Release, "AVMA reaffirms commitment to host Pike Place Fish Market educational program," is available at

http://www.avma.org/press/releases/090612_pike_place_fish_market.asp  



6/16/09
Cattle Tuberculosis Confirmed in Texas; 
Check with States of Destination Before Shipping Cattle

Cattle tuberculosis (TB) has been confirmed in a west Texas dairy that has been quarantined since April when some cattle in the herd responded to a TB test being conducted prior to a sale. (The sale was cancelled.)
The cattle TB diagnosis was confirmed at the National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa, where M. bovis, or cattle TB bacteria, was grown or “cultured” from tissues that had been collected during the necropsy of the test-positive cattle. 

“The infected herd remains quarantined while the final disposition of the herd is determined either slaughtering the herd, or repeatedly testing and removing infected animals until the herd is free of cattle TB,” said Dr. Bob Hillman, Texas’ state veterinarian and head of the Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC), the state’s livestock and poultry health regulatory agency. “Dairy, calf-raising and dairy animal replacement operations with epidemiological links to the infected herd are being tested to determine both the origin and potential spread of the disease.”

“I encourage ranchers or accredited veterinarians to call the state of destination prior to shipping bison, beef or dairy cattle out of Texas,” said Dr. Hillman. “Some states may impose enhanced TB entry requirements on Texas cattle and bison. Keep in mind, too, that many states, like Texas, have implemented cattle trichomoniasis testing requirements, so call before you haul.”

Dr. Hillman said Texas’ cattle TB-free status with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) could be in jeopardy, if the infected dairy cannot be depopulated, or if a second infected herd is detected within 48 months. 
Nebraska, in early June, confirmed TB infection in a beef herd. Currently, California and Minnesota are not cattle TB-free, and areas in Michigan and New Mexico have specified zones that are not TB-free. When TB-free status is lost, breeding cattle and bison moved out of a state need a negative TB test within 60 days prior to shipment, or animals must originate from a herd that has accredited TB-free status, achieved through a formal testing and retesting program.

Texas initially gained TB-free status in November 2000, when all counties except El Paso and portions of Hudspeth Counties were declared free of the disease. (The El Paso Milk Shed had a history of recurring infection, and eventually, the dairies were depopulated. Dairies no longer operate in this area along the U.S.-Mexican border near El Paso.) 

In June 2002, Texas lost TB-free status after infection was detected in a beef herd and in an operation with both beef and dairy cattle. To regain TB-free status, 2,014 Texas purebred beef herds and the state’s 818 dairies were tested for the disease from October 2003 through August 2006. One TB-infected dairy was detected and depopulated. In September 2006, the USDA issued the coveted TB-free status for all of Texas’ 254 counties.

When exposed to cattle TB, an animal’s immune system will fight the invasion by encapsulating the bacteria. This can cause the formation of lesions or growths in and on lymph nodes, mammary glands, lungs and other internal organs. Although infected, the animals may appear healthy, until the latter stages of the disease, when signs may include weight loss, coughing or breathing difficulties. The disease is not treatable in livestock.

“Cattle TB is a serious, transmissible disease that can spread among herds,” said Dr. Hillman. “In the early 1900s, when the national cattle TB eradication program was initiated, more than five percent of the country’s herds were infected with the disease. At that time, cattle TB posed a significant human health threat, because consumers could become infected when they drank raw, unpasteurized milk that had not been through heat-treatment to kill bacteria. Today, commercially produced milk is pasteurized. While bovine TB is still a human health threat, other forms of tuberculosis, such as the human and avian strains, now pose the greatest risk of TB exposure to persons.”

For info, contact Carla Everett, information officer, at 1-800-550-8242, ext. 710, or ceverett@tahc.state.tx.us. Texas Animal Health Commission.



6/16/2009
Nation's First Case of Vesicular Stomatitis (VS) for 2009 Detected in Texas


The nation's first case of vesicular stomatitis (VS) for 2009 has been detected in a horse in Starr County, in far south Texas. VS is a sporadically occurring virus that is endemic to the U.S. Signs of the disease include blisters, lesions and sloughing of the skin on the muzzles, tongue, teats and above the hooves of susceptible livestock, which include horses, cattle, sheep, pigs, deer and some other species of animals. 

"The most recent outbreak was in 2006 limited to Wyoming only, where 17 horses and a dozen cattle on 13 premises were confirmed to have the virus," said Dr. Bob Hillman, Texas' state veterinarian and head of the Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC), the state's livestock and poultry health regulatory agency. "To prevent the spread or introduction of infection, many states and countries will place additional entry requirements or restrictions on the movement of animals from affected states, or portions of the state. Call the state or country of destination before moving livestock, to ensure that all entry requirements can be met. Do not risk shipments being turned away, or worse, spreading disease and facing legal action by animal health authorities."

"Often horses are the signal, or first, animals to be confirmed with vesicular stomatitis when the virus is active. If the blisters and lesions are seen in cattle, sheep, pigs or other cloven-hooved animals, our first concern is a possible introduction of foot-and-mouth disease, the most costly and destructive foreign animal disease. Horses are not susceptible to foot-and-mouth disease, but anytime blisters or unusual sores are seen, animals should be examined by a veterinarian as soon as possible."

"Move sick animals away from the remainder of the herd to protect against disease spread," urged Dr. Hillman. "Do not move sick animals from the premises, and call your veterinarian or the nearest Texas Animal Health Commission area office, or the Austin headquarters at 800-550-8242. Laboratory testing to confirm infection can be run at no charge to the livestock owner. 

"Vesicular stomatitis is painful for affected animals, but usually, the lesions will heal within two weeks to a month. For some severe cases, owners may elect to have an infected animal euthanized, to put an
end to the suffering. In dairies, VS infection can lead to a substantial loss of production," said Dr. Hillman. Treatment of VS-infected animals consists of supportive care, and antibiotics may be needed to prevent secondary infections in the open sores. Animal health officials in nearly all states, including Texas, require VS-infected animals and their herd mates to be quarantined until at least 21 days after all lesions have healed. A follow-up examination of the animals by the state veterinarian's office is required prior to quarantine release.

VS outbreaks are extremely sporadic, and years may lapse between cases. Sand flies and black flies are thought to play a role in the virus transmission, so controlling insects is important. In 2005, the VS outbreak involved livestock on at least 445 premises in nine states, including Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, Texas, Utah and Wyoming. In 2004, affected animals were detected in eight counties each in Texas and New Mexico and in 22 Colorado counties. Before the 2004 outbreak, VS had been "silent" since 1998, when Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Texas had cases.

More information about VS and a map showing the location of Starr County in Texas are available on the TAHC web site at: http://www.tahc.state.tx.us.

For info, contact Carla Everett, information officer, at 1-800-550-8242, ext. 710, or ceverett@tahc.state.tx.usTexas Animal Health Commission.

 


 

Washington Poison Center to begin charging fees
Due to pending State budget cuts, the Washington Poison Center (WPC) will begin charging a $30 credit card fee to answer veterinary exposure questions effective June 15, 2009. Last year alone, WPC answered over 8,500 calls about animals ranging from fish to rabbits to cats and to horses.

Alternative help for animal poison information can be found at:

Animal Poison Control Center 1-888-426-4435
24 hours a day, 365 days a year. A $60 consultation fee may apply.

The Pet Poison HELPLINET 1-800-213-6680 
24 hour a day. A $35 fee may apply.

National Pesticide Information Center
 (NPIC) 1-800-858-7378
Open from 6:30AM to 4:30PM Pacific time, daily.
They will transfer the call to the National Animal Poison Center free of charge in an emergency.

For more information on the budget crisis, please visit www.wapc.org.

May 2009

Voluntary Recall of Limited Range of Nutro Dry Cat Food Products

Dear Doctor:

Out of an abundance of caution, on May 21, 2009, Nutro Products 
announced a voluntary recall of select varieties of NUTRO(R) 
NATURAL CHOICE(R) COMPLETE CARE(R) Dry Cat Foods and NUTRO(R) 
MAX(R) Cat Dry Foods with "Best If Used By Dates" between May 12, 
2010 and August 22, 2010. This recall is due to incorrect levels 
of zinc and potassium in our finished product resulting from a 
production error by a US-based premix supplier.

Two mineral premixes were affected. One premix contained excessive 
levels of zinc and under-supplemented potassium. The second premix 
under-supplemented potassium. Both zinc and potassium are essential 
nutrients for cats and are added as nutritional supplements to NUTRO(R) 
dry cat food.
As soon as we became aware of the issue, we made the decision to hold 
shipments of affected dry cat product, and took immediate action to 
verify with our mineral premix supplier that no other products were 
affected. We then contacted the FDA to notify them of the voluntary 
recall. A full list of affected product and available alternatives 
for your clients is available at 
http://aci-direct.net/c.asp?770197&94fa184e33aed563&1  

We have completed a comprehensive audit of premixes for all NUTRO(R) 
products, and have confirmed that this issue only affects certain dry 
cat food products. No other NUTRO(R) products are affected, including 
dry dog food, wet dog and cat foods and dog and cat treats. 

Consumers who have purchased affected product should immediately 
discontinue feeding the product to their cats, and switch to another 
product with a balanced nutritional profile. While we have received 
no consumer complaints related to this issue, cat owners should monitor 
their cat for symptoms, including a reduction in appetite or refusal 
of food, weight loss, vomiting or diarrhea. We have suggested that 
cat owners contact their veterinarian if their cat is experiencing 
health issues or is pregnant.

Consumers who have purchased product affected by this voluntary recall 
should return it to their retailer for a full refund or exchange for 
another NUTRO(R) dry cat food product.

Affected product was distributed to retail customers in all 50 states, 
as well as to customers in Canada, Mexico, Japan, Korea, Thailand, 
Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, New Zealand, and Israel. We are 
working with all of our distributors and retail customers, in both 
the US and internationally, to ensure that the recalled products are 
not on store shelves.

At Nutro Products, our top priority has always been and continues to 
be the health and welfare of pets and their owners. If you have any 
further questions, including the need for additional information on 
clinical signs, please call 1-800-833-5330 and identify yourself as a 
veterinary professional or visit 
http://aci-direct.net/c.asp?770197&94fa184e33aed563&1  

Sincerely,

Dr. Tiffany Bierer
Health and Nutrition Manager
Nutro Products Inc.

April

H1N1 Influenza (Swine Flu) Information - latest news, updates and helpful links.


WSVMA successful in passing legislation – Governor Gregoire signs bill into law

House Bill 1271 Regarding the preparing and administration of drugs by registered or licensed veterinary personnel passed the legislature and was signed into law this afternoon by Governor Chris Gregoire. The WSVMA worked with the Veterinary Board of Governors and the Board of Pharmacy to draft the legislation that closes a loophole in the law that has prevented licensed veterinary technicians the ability to prepare and administer legend drugs and controlled substances under the supervision of a veterinarian. Letters from the WSVMA and the Washington State Association of Veterinary Technicians were sent to Governor Gregoire highlighting the pertinent points of the bill and encouraging her to sign it into law. 

Sincere appreciation goes to Dr. Kathy Haigh, veterinarian and state representative who sponsored the bill and lent her time and support in testifying and assisting the WSVMA in its successful passage and Greg Hanon, WSVMA’s Legislative Advocate, who was instrumental in shepherding the bill through the process. Thanks also go to Dr. Debi Wallingford, WSVMA President, Dr. Harmon Rogers from the Veterinary Board of Governors, Department of Health staff, and to Dr. Carrie La Jeunesse, WSVMA President-Elect, who took the time to travel to Olympia to testify before the House Committee on Agriculture & Natural Resources.


Drug Compounding Resources

The role of drug compounding is now part of the discussion surrounding the tragic deaths of 21 horses from the Lechuza Caracas polo team on April 19 at the International Polo Club Palm Beach in Wellington, Fla. At this time, toxicology results have not been released by Florida officials.

The AAEP has extensive resources available to members on the subject of drug compounding. You will find the AAEP’s position statement, “Equine Veterinary Compounding Guidelines,” as well as an overview of legal issues and helpful introductions to the basic principles of compounding on the AAEP’s Web site. Due to continuing media attention, you may receive phone calls from your local media outlets about the subject of compounding and its role in veterinary medicine. We have also provided general messages on the Web site for your use when talking with the media. Talking Points.

If you have any questions about drug compounding, please call the AAEP office at (800) 443-0177 (U.S. & Canada) or (859) 233-0147, or by e-mail at aaepoffice@aaep.org.

 


 

EPA increasing scrutiny of topical flea and tick products

EPA Advisory about “Spot-On” Insecticides

Talking Points

(Schaumburg, IL) April 16, 2009 --- In response to more than 44,000 potential adverse reactions to spot-on flea and tick products reported in 2008, the Environmental Protection Agency is intensifying its evaluation of these products. No recalls have been issued at this time. The AVMA will continue to maintain contact with the EPA and monitor the situation, and updates will be posted as they come to our attention.

See the EPA's statement, including a chart of products.

Information about reporting adverse events.


Washington State Department of Agriculture has adapted a refresher training video for accredited veterinarians to be registered to collect Trichomoniasis samples from bulls.

Only veterinarians registered with WSDA can collect official samples and send to an official lab. Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory at WSU is an official lab for culture of Trichomoniasis samples. WSU Vet Med Extension has posted the video at: http://vetextension.wsu.edu/programs/bovine/trich/index.htm for registration and viewing. If you have any questions or comments, please send them to the Program Coordinator who’s information you’ll find on the webpage.


Trichomoniasis Testing Course for Bovine Practitioners

Trichomoniasis is a venereal disease among cattle that can cause abortions, low pregnancy rates and delayed or prolonged calving seasons. Please take the online course developed by Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) Animal Health Program and Genex Cooperative Inc. in association with The National Association of Animal Breeders and Certified Semen Services. Read full story.


Veterinarians included in FTC’s Red Flags Rule - Effective May 1, 2009

Incidents of identity theft are increasing exponentially each year. Under the FTC’s Red Flags Rule, certain businesses (including health care professionals and many veterinarians) are required to identify and mitigate the warning signs or red flags that often can be the telltale signs of identity theft. To comply with the Red Flags Rule, veterinarians may need to develop a written “red flags program” to prevent, detect, and minimize the damage from identity theft. Although the rule went into effect January 2008, mandatory compliance begins May 1, 2009. Read Full Story.

March 2009

The Association for Women Veterinarians Foundation is again requesting nominations for their Outstanding Women Veterinarian of the Year and Distinguished Service Award.

Important notice from NSF on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and priorities for the stimulus funding. 

AVMA Update on possible illnesses due to chicken jerky treats

USDA CEM Incident Situation Report 3/06/09. 

February 2009

USDA CEM Incident Situation Report 2/26/09. 

USDA CEM Incident Situation Report 2/23/09. 

The USDA APHIS Hot Issues web link for CEM is:
http://www.aphis.usda.gov/newsroom/hot_issues/cem/index.shtml

The USDA APHIS National Center for Import Center (NCIE) International Animal Export Regulations web link is:http://www.aphis.usda.gov/regulations/vs/iregs/animals/

Latest News on Peanut Product Recalls

Information for Veterinarians and Veterinary Professionals regarding Pets and the Peanut Butter and Peanut-Product Recall. CDC, February 14, 2009.

Answers for Veterinarians about the Recall of Products due to possible Salmonella typhimurium ContaminationAVMA web site Feb. 12, 2009

Latest news on peanut  product recall from AVMA

Peanut butter pet food products on recall list continue to grow. AVMA Bulletin, Feb. 3, 2009

January 2009

PetSmart Recalls Grreat Choice Dog Biscuits

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE -- PHOENIX, AZ, January 20, 2009 -- PetSmart is voluntarily recalling seven of its Grreat Choice® Dog Biscuit products that contain peanut paste made by Peanut Corporation of America (PCA). PCA is the focus of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration investigation into potential salmonella contamination of peanut butter and paste made at its Blakely, Georgia facility.

Although PetSmart is not aware of any reported cases of illness related to these products, it has removed these products from its store shelves and website and is conducting the recall as a precautionary measure.

The recalled products include only the following types of Grreat Choice Dog Biscuits sold between Aug. 21, 2008 and Jan. 19, 2009:

  • Small Assorted 32 oz., UPC 73725702900
  • Small/Medium Assorted 4 lb., UPC 73725700601
  • Small/Medium Assorted 8 lb., UPC 73725700605
  • Small/Medium Assorted 10 lb., UPC 73725702755
  • Large Assorted 8 lb., UPC 73725700638
  • Extra Large Assorted 8 lb., UPC 73725700779
  • Peanut Butter 4 lb., UPC 73725700766

Customers who purchased the recalled dog biscuit products should discontinue use immediately and can return the product to any PetSmart store for a complete refund or exchange. Customers can visit www.petsmartfacts.com for more information or contact PetSmart Customer Service at 1-888-839-9638.

No other products or flavors are included in this recall.

FDA press release
PetsMart web site

Winter Storm Reports and Information:

Recovery Information for Floods, Power Outages Available from WSU Extension

Dairy Cattle and Floods


 

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Washington State Veterinary Medical Association 
8024 Bracken Pl SE, Snoqualmie, WA 98065
Phone: (425) 396-3191, FAX: (425) 396-3192, E-Mail: info@wsvma.org

 

 

 

 

  

 


 

 


 

 


 

 


 

Washington State 

Veterinary Medical Association 
8024 Bracken Pl SE
Snoqualmie, WA 98065

Phone: (425) 396-3191
Fax: (425) 396-3192
E-Mail: info@wsvma.org 

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